Karl Müller, entrepreneur and inventor behind kybun

Background
Karl Müller was born in Roggwil in the canton of Thurgau, Switzerland, in 1952. After finishing his studies in Mechanical Engineering at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, he moved to South Korea in 1979. He studied at the Seoul National University on a studentship. Seven months after Müller began his studies, Park Chung-hee, then president of South Korea, was assassinated and universities were closed due to mass demonstrations.

Discovering his entrepreneurial spirit
This incident forced Müller to search for a job in Korea in 1980. He found a gap in the market and founded his first company, a supplier of Swiss specialties to hotels. He established 12 companies in Korea in the following years. He opened up restaurants, sold textile machines and became the first retailer to import skiing equipment to Korea. Everything he put his hand to became a huge financial success.

Highs and lows
However, Karl Müller eventually experienced burnout after his continued success. He sold all of his companies in 1990 and returned to Lake Constance in Switzerland in order to recover his health. He bought a farm and became self-sufficient for 10 years. During this time, he founded a private rehabilitation centre for drug addicts as a non-profit organisation. However, he ran out of money after three years and began to work as a driver at weekly markets.

The founding of MBT
Karl Müller discovered the positive effects of clay soil while he was in Korea. The soil in paddy fields becomes soft and springy once the water drains out, making it very comfortable to stand and walk on. This gave him the inspiration to create the MBT shoe. He researched and developed the concept by trying on the working shoe models himself.

Müller then introduced the MBT shoe to the market in 1997, revolutionising the shoe industry with the ‘rollover sole’. The rollover shoe proved to have therapeutic effects, and is now copied by over 100 shoe manufacturers worldwide.

kyBoot – the new generation (from MBT to kybun)
Karl Müller continued to investigate how to recreate the comfort of standing in paddy fields even more accurately. He originally wanted to use the soft, springy sole he developed in the next generation of MBT shoes. However, his minority shareholding partners wanted to continue with the round sole model, so he parted ways with MBT on good terms in 2006. The model he had developed then became the new kyBoot brand. He founded kybun AG in 2007 and began to develop the kyBoot shoe and other supplementary products.

kybun movement concept
The kyBoot shoe is a part of the kybun movement concept, which also includes the soft, springy kyBounder mat and the soft kyTrainer treadmill.

Swiss newspaper SonntagsZeitung has named Karl Müller one of the most innovative entrepreneurs in Switzerland, and declared that he is making design history.